Todd_and_Brad_Reeds_Michigan_Wednesdays_Dust_Jacket_2-11-15_4256_jpeg.jpg
Todd and Brad’s Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten
Book and images available for purchase!

button_buy_now.jpg

VIEW_IMAGES_HERE.jpg

Look at Michigan!

Brad_Reed_2218_Wednesday_July_16_2014_Whaler_Sunset_Redone_and_Spotted_on_3_04_2015.jpg


See her breathtaking beauty through the eyes of two of the Mitten State’s finest outdoor photographers.

 

Todd and Brad’s Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten takes you along with a father and son who set out every Wednesday for a year discovering and revealing Michigan’s natural heart and soul with their cameras.

 

As extensively as the Reeds showcased the beauty of Michigan in their state, national, and international award-winningTuesdays book, they discovered even more splendor in both the Upper and Lower Peninsulas on Wednesdays.

 

Appreciate how visually stunning Michigan is through the poetic imagery captured during this 30,000-mile vision quest.

Brad_Reed_1562_Wednesday_June_18_2014_Iris_Shopping.jpg


Come away, as Todd and Brad Reed have, more in awe of Michigan.

Todd_Reed_1153_Wednesday_February_26_2014_A_Mid_Winter_Days_Dream.jpg


OUR JOURNEY

Michigan called to us again.

 

Michigan’s beauty is irresistible and uplifting. Her heartbeat helps us find our own.

 

Two years after spending a year of Tuesdays exploring and photographing Michigan, we felt compelled to spend a year of Wednesdays searching for, seeing, and revealing the heart and soul of our glorious state with our cameras.

 

We had discovered a magnificent Michigan on those 52 Tuesdays. That exploratory mission and resulting book, Tuesdays with Todd and Brad Reed: a Michigan Tribute, moved us and many other Michiganders to fall more in love with our water wonderland. Tuesdays was selected as one of the 20 Michigan Notable Books of 2014 and went on to win several national and international book awards.

 

But the Mitten State had more beauty to reveal. We knew from our travels there was a greater visual story to tell of Michigan places familiar to us and those we had not yet seen, a story that would make it as crystal clear as Lake Superior’s waters that Michigan is one of the most beautiful places in the United States of America.

 

We needed to take our gifts of seeing on the road again each week in another intensive effort to pay tribute to Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas with our cameras. And so we devoted all 53 Wednesdays of another year to capturing and sharing Michigan’s beauty with the rest of the world.

Todd_Reed_3928_Wednesday_March_26_2014_Artist_In_Heaven.jpg


Todd and Brad Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten
was born out of a year of Wednesdays spent crisscrossing Michigan in passionate pursuit of magic Michigan moments. We drove more than 30,000 miles and hiked, boated, and flew hundreds more. We meandered Michigan’s highways and byways many times in search of both planned images we pre-visualized from our hometown of Ludington, and unplanned images waiting to be discovered.

 

Wednesdays was also born out of a need to once again restore our photographic souls by assigning ourselves a working vacation. Being outdoors in Michigan photographing all day every Wednesday was a priceless escape from the crazy pace of our ever-growing Ludington photography business, from working at our gallery, teaching weekend workshops, and putting on photography programs across the state. Photography is therapeutic for us.

 

We let Michigan speak to us. Good photography is all about feeling. When Michigan spoke, we listened with our hearts to identify and focus our cameras on exactly what was moving us. Our goal was to make photographic art that evokes and emotes in a way that inspires our viewers to experience magic Michigan moments as though they were experiencing them first-hand.

 

We chased after Michigan with our cameras each Wednesday like there was no tomorrow, and there wasn’t; our self-imposed assignment limited this project to one day a week. Our ethics precluded any exceptions.

 

Michigan had plenty of visual surprises and treats in store on Wednesdays, no matter the place or the weather. Mother Nature might have been laughing at us as we photographed Laughing Whitefish Falls in a downpour, but we loved the richness of the autumn images we made there. We know bad weather is often good-to-great weather for photography. So even on “bad” days, our senses and emotions were often as overloaded as when we were children playing in the snow for the first time.

Todd_Reed_3479_Wednesday_November_26_2014_Winter_on_the_Platte.jpg


Michigan mesmerized us with ice sculptures more fabulous than any human could create at the Grand Island ice caves along the Lake Superior shoreline in Munising Bay.

 

Michigan astounded us at the Manistee River High Rollaway with a glorious birds-eye view of Northern Michigan woodlands on fire with fall color as far as the eye could see.

 

Michigan delighted us with the sight of butterflies and hummingbirds flitting from flower to flower on a gorgeous summer morning at Dow Gardens in Midland.

 

Michigan presented us with a glorious Portage Lake sunrise, an early morning jewel that dazzled summer vacationers on their annual pilgrimage to Onekama.

 

Michigan dazzled us with the man-made spectacle of downtown Rochester lit up so brightly for the holidays that Santa and his reindeer would have needed sunglasses.

 

Michigan revealed more of her four-season beauty than we ever could have anticipated. We had been to many of the most spectacular places in both the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of the Mitten State. And yet, we were shocked to see the incredibly diverse and equally spectacular views offered in different seasons at natural wonders like the Great Lakes, Tahquamenon Falls, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Hartwick Pines, Nordhouse Dunes Wilderness Area and Silver Lake Sand Dunes.

 

We have traveled Michigan highways, byways, trails, shores and waters more than most Michiganders. But there is so much Michigan to see, and so we made it a point to spend time in places suggested to us by others who are passionate about their favorite Mitten spots. We also checked off a couple more islands from our Michigan bucket list.

Brad_Reed_2455_Wednesday_July_30_2014_Soul_Seeker_Redone_and_Spotted_on_2_27_2015.jpg


At the top of our Michigan bucket list was Isle Royale, Michigan’s only National Park. Isle Royale is actually a series of islands in Lake Superior that can be reached only by boat or seaplane. Our Isle Royale adventure began with a lively Great Lake ferry ride from Houghton in six- to twelve-foot waves. Our first glimpse of the rocky northeast coast of Isle Royale en route to Rock Harbor foretold this is a rugged, wild place.

 

Being action people, we hiked almost non-stop during our Wednesday on Isle Royale. Being positive thinkers, we kept thinking we would see a wolf or a moose at the next bend or over the top of every rocky mound. The moose and wolf never materialized, but it didn’t dampen our enthusiasm for hiking the challenging terrain and shooting until the Wednesday clock ran out.

 

Our reward for perseverance was being privileged shortly before midnight to witness northern lights dancing in the sky over Isle Royale and to hear the elusive moose and loons sound their echoing call of the wild from the far side of Tobin Lake.

 

Another incredible Michigan bucket list adventure involved hiking nearly a mile across frozen Lake Superior on a below-zero March morning to Grand Island ice caves. One of the coldest winters in Michigan’s history enabled us to dare crossing ice-covered Munising Bay with three in-it-to-win-it friends from the Charlevoix Camera Club.

 

As we approached the northeast corner of Grand Island, the sun rising over the Pictured Rocks turned the ice-coated rocky cliffs into a gleaming mirror larger than Michigan’s biggest football stadium. We stopped reveling over our safe passage and the view before us long enough to make a few exterior images before splitting up to find entrances to the caves behind the ice walls.

 

We had experienced and photographed many phenomenal views in the Michigan outdoors, but nothing prepared us for what we witnessed inside the Grand Island ice caves. We felt like we were stepping into God’s art studio as we entered a glowing world of intricately sculpted green and white ice. One cave looked like a crystal cathedral. In another chamber, we found ourselves surrounded by natural sculptures resembling giant lava lamps that appeared to be flowing, although we knew they would be frozen in place until the spring thaw. Few places on Earth could be as incredibly glorious as this place. We were, and still are, most grateful for the experience and the privilege to make images testifying to the beauty we beheld.

 

To make Michigan look its best, we upgraded our image-making capability with Nikon D800 digital cameras with full-frame sensors about a third of the way into this project; thus, we were both shooting with the Ferrari of 35-millimeter cameras.

 

Just as no two race car drivers drive the same, no two photographers shoot the same. Our cameras were identical and we might shoot side by side, but we would see and render the world around us very differently. This illustrates what we believe is by far the most exciting aspect of photography—the human element. Photography transcends the click of a shutter; the person behind the image makes the image more than the camera does. Therein lies the high ground of photography.

 

In our case, both of us photographed Michigan like our lives depended on it, but our working methods were as different as our personalities. Brad photographed Michigan like a sniper: thoughtfully, precisely, efficiently, systematically, sparingly, working fast, yet never pulling the trigger until the image in the viewfinder looked exactly picture-perfect.

 

Todd worked feverishly, consumed with trying to see and evaluate everything in the viewfinder, rarely satisfied he had made his best shot. Being a perfectionist meant he tended to spend far more time finishing one image in contrast to Brad’s fast-paced style. Todd fired off 24,229 shots at Michigan, about four times as many as Brad. We hope you find a little of yourself in both styles.

 

We went through a slow and deliberate process to decide which of the more than 30,000 digital exposures would end up in this book. The best images quickly rose to the top during editing, but after our initial edit, there was still too much of Michigan to fit in one book. Our challenge was to pare the images down to those that would best stand as our testimony to the beauty of our state.

 

All of us on Team Reed, including especially our managers, Sarah Genson and Rachel Gaudette, spent thousands of hours editing our Michigan images, writing, designing, and creating Todd and Brad Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten. We hope spending Wednesdays in the Mitten with us via this book will help others see Michigan better, experience her more fully and respect her more deeply.

 

Imagine what is over the next Michigan hill or around the next curve, bend, or point. Go see and explore Michigan with your friends and family and enjoy the journey!



BLOG

Todd and Brad’s Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays

Todd_and_Brad_Reeds_Michigan_Wednesdays_Dust_Jacket_2-11-15_4256_jpeg.jpg

Todd and Brad’s Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten
Book and images available for purchase!

button_buy_now.jpg

VIEW_IMAGES_HERE.jpg

Look at Michigan!

Brad_Reed_2218_Wednesday_July_16_2014_Whaler_Sunset_Redone_and_Spotted_on_3_04_2015.jpg


See her breathtaking beauty through the eyes of two of the Mitten State’s finest outdoor photographers.

 

Todd and Brad’s Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten takes you along with a father and son who set out every Wednesday for a year discovering and revealing Michigan’s natural heart and soul with their cameras.

 

As extensively as the Reeds showcased the beauty of Michigan in their state, national, and international award-winningTuesdays book, they discovered even more splendor in both the Upper and Lower Peninsulas on Wednesdays.

 

Appreciate how visually stunning Michigan is through the poetic imagery captured during this 30,000-mile vision quest.

Brad_Reed_1562_Wednesday_June_18_2014_Iris_Shopping.jpg


Come away, as Todd and Brad Reed have, more in awe of Michigan.

Todd_Reed_1153_Wednesday_February_26_2014_A_Mid_Winter_Days_Dream.jpg


OUR JOURNEY

Michigan called to us again.

 

Michigan’s beauty is irresistible and uplifting. Her heartbeat helps us find our own.

 

Two years after spending a year of Tuesdays exploring and photographing Michigan, we felt compelled to spend a year of Wednesdays searching for, seeing, and revealing the heart and soul of our glorious state with our cameras.

 

We had discovered a magnificent Michigan on those 52 Tuesdays. That exploratory mission and resulting book, Tuesdays with Todd and Brad Reed: a Michigan Tribute, moved us and many other Michiganders to fall more in love with our water wonderland. Tuesdays was selected as one of the 20 Michigan Notable Books of 2014 and went on to win several national and international book awards.

 

But the Mitten State had more beauty to reveal. We knew from our travels there was a greater visual story to tell of Michigan places familiar to us and those we had not yet seen, a story that would make it as crystal clear as Lake Superior’s waters that Michigan is one of the most beautiful places in the United States of America.

 

We needed to take our gifts of seeing on the road again each week in another intensive effort to pay tribute to Michigan’s Upper and Lower Peninsulas with our cameras. And so we devoted all 53 Wednesdays of another year to capturing and sharing Michigan’s beauty with the rest of the world.

Todd_Reed_3928_Wednesday_March_26_2014_Artist_In_Heaven.jpg


Todd and Brad Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten
was born out of a year of Wednesdays spent crisscrossing Michigan in passionate pursuit of magic Michigan moments. We drove more than 30,000 miles and hiked, boated, and flew hundreds more. We meandered Michigan’s highways and byways many times in search of both planned images we pre-visualized from our hometown of Ludington, and unplanned images waiting to be discovered.

 

Wednesdays was also born out of a need to once again restore our photographic souls by assigning ourselves a working vacation. Being outdoors in Michigan photographing all day every Wednesday was a priceless escape from the crazy pace of our ever-growing Ludington photography business, from working at our gallery, teaching weekend workshops, and putting on photography programs across the state. Photography is therapeutic for us.

 

We let Michigan speak to us. Good photography is all about feeling. When Michigan spoke, we listened with our hearts to identify and focus our cameras on exactly what was moving us. Our goal was to make photographic art that evokes and emotes in a way that inspires our viewers to experience magic Michigan moments as though they were experiencing them first-hand.

 

We chased after Michigan with our cameras each Wednesday like there was no tomorrow, and there wasn’t; our self-imposed assignment limited this project to one day a week. Our ethics precluded any exceptions.

 

Michigan had plenty of visual surprises and treats in store on Wednesdays, no matter the place or the weather. Mother Nature might have been laughing at us as we photographed Laughing Whitefish Falls in a downpour, but we loved the richness of the autumn images we made there. We know bad weather is often good-to-great weather for photography. So even on “bad” days, our senses and emotions were often as overloaded as when we were children playing in the snow for the first time.

Todd_Reed_3479_Wednesday_November_26_2014_Winter_on_the_Platte.jpg


Michigan mesmerized us with ice sculptures more fabulous than any human could create at the Grand Island ice caves along the Lake Superior shoreline in Munising Bay.

 

Michigan astounded us at the Manistee River High Rollaway with a glorious birds-eye view of Northern Michigan woodlands on fire with fall color as far as the eye could see.

 

Michigan delighted us with the sight of butterflies and hummingbirds flitting from flower to flower on a gorgeous summer morning at Dow Gardens in Midland.

 

Michigan presented us with a glorious Portage Lake sunrise, an early morning jewel that dazzled summer vacationers on their annual pilgrimage to Onekama.

 

Michigan dazzled us with the man-made spectacle of downtown Rochester lit up so brightly for the holidays that Santa and his reindeer would have needed sunglasses.

 

Michigan revealed more of her four-season beauty than we ever could have anticipated. We had been to many of the most spectacular places in both the Upper and Lower Peninsulas of the Mitten State. And yet, we were shocked to see the incredibly diverse and equally spectacular views offered in different seasons at natural wonders like the Great Lakes, Tahquamenon Falls, Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore, Hartwick Pines, Nordhouse Dunes Wilderness Area and Silver Lake Sand Dunes.

 

We have traveled Michigan highways, byways, trails, shores and waters more than most Michiganders. But there is so much Michigan to see, and so we made it a point to spend time in places suggested to us by others who are passionate about their favorite Mitten spots. We also checked off a couple more islands from our Michigan bucket list.

Brad_Reed_2455_Wednesday_July_30_2014_Soul_Seeker_Redone_and_Spotted_on_2_27_2015.jpg


At the top of our Michigan bucket list was Isle Royale, Michigan’s only National Park. Isle Royale is actually a series of islands in Lake Superior that can be reached only by boat or seaplane. Our Isle Royale adventure began with a lively Great Lake ferry ride from Houghton in six- to twelve-foot waves. Our first glimpse of the rocky northeast coast of Isle Royale en route to Rock Harbor foretold this is a rugged, wild place.

 

Being action people, we hiked almost non-stop during our Wednesday on Isle Royale. Being positive thinkers, we kept thinking we would see a wolf or a moose at the next bend or over the top of every rocky mound. The moose and wolf never materialized, but it didn’t dampen our enthusiasm for hiking the challenging terrain and shooting until the Wednesday clock ran out.

 

Our reward for perseverance was being privileged shortly before midnight to witness northern lights dancing in the sky over Isle Royale and to hear the elusive moose and loons sound their echoing call of the wild from the far side of Tobin Lake.

 

Another incredible Michigan bucket list adventure involved hiking nearly a mile across frozen Lake Superior on a below-zero March morning to Grand Island ice caves. One of the coldest winters in Michigan’s history enabled us to dare crossing ice-covered Munising Bay with three in-it-to-win-it friends from the Charlevoix Camera Club.

 

As we approached the northeast corner of Grand Island, the sun rising over the Pictured Rocks turned the ice-coated rocky cliffs into a gleaming mirror larger than Michigan’s biggest football stadium. We stopped reveling over our safe passage and the view before us long enough to make a few exterior images before splitting up to find entrances to the caves behind the ice walls.

 

We had experienced and photographed many phenomenal views in the Michigan outdoors, but nothing prepared us for what we witnessed inside the Grand Island ice caves. We felt like we were stepping into God’s art studio as we entered a glowing world of intricately sculpted green and white ice. One cave looked like a crystal cathedral. In another chamber, we found ourselves surrounded by natural sculptures resembling giant lava lamps that appeared to be flowing, although we knew they would be frozen in place until the spring thaw. Few places on Earth could be as incredibly glorious as this place. We were, and still are, most grateful for the experience and the privilege to make images testifying to the beauty we beheld.

 

To make Michigan look its best, we upgraded our image-making capability with Nikon D800 digital cameras with full-frame sensors about a third of the way into this project; thus, we were both shooting with the Ferrari of 35-millimeter cameras.

 

Just as no two race car drivers drive the same, no two photographers shoot the same. Our cameras were identical and we might shoot side by side, but we would see and render the world around us very differently. This illustrates what we believe is by far the most exciting aspect of photography—the human element. Photography transcends the click of a shutter; the person behind the image makes the image more than the camera does. Therein lies the high ground of photography.

 

In our case, both of us photographed Michigan like our lives depended on it, but our working methods were as different as our personalities. Brad photographed Michigan like a sniper: thoughtfully, precisely, efficiently, systematically, sparingly, working fast, yet never pulling the trigger until the image in the viewfinder looked exactly picture-perfect.

 

Todd worked feverishly, consumed with trying to see and evaluate everything in the viewfinder, rarely satisfied he had made his best shot. Being a perfectionist meant he tended to spend far more time finishing one image in contrast to Brad’s fast-paced style. Todd fired off 24,229 shots at Michigan, about four times as many as Brad. We hope you find a little of yourself in both styles.

 

We went through a slow and deliberate process to decide which of the more than 30,000 digital exposures would end up in this book. The best images quickly rose to the top during editing, but after our initial edit, there was still too much of Michigan to fit in one book. Our challenge was to pare the images down to those that would best stand as our testimony to the beauty of our state.

 

All of us on Team Reed, including especially our managers, Sarah Genson and Rachel Gaudette, spent thousands of hours editing our Michigan images, writing, designing, and creating Todd and Brad Reed’s Michigan: Wednesdays in the Mitten. We hope spending Wednesdays in the Mitten with us via this book will help others see Michigan better, experience her more fully and respect her more deeply.

 

Imagine what is over the next Michigan hill or around the next curve, bend, or point. Go see and explore Michigan with your friends and family and enjoy the journey!